Etymology
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cultivation (n.)

1700, "the devoting of special attention or study to the development of" (a branch of  knowledge); by 1716 in the general sense of "promotion of mental growth or development," in both cases a figurative use, from French cultivation (16c.), noun of action from cultiver, from Latin cultivare "to till" (see cultivate). Meaning "the raising of a plant or crop" is from 1719; sense of "act or practice of tilling land and preparing it for crops" is from 1725.

updated on June 02, 2018

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Definitions of cultivation from WordNet

cultivation (n.)
socialization through training and education to develop one's mind or manners;
her cultivation was remarkable
cultivation (n.)
(agriculture) production of food by preparing the land to grow crops (especially on a large scale);
cultivation (n.)
a highly developed state of perfection; having a flawless or impeccable quality; "almost an inspiration which gives to all work that finish which is almost art"--Joseph Conrad;
Synonyms: polish / refinement / culture / finish
cultivation (n.)
the process of fostering the growth of something;
the cultivation of bees for honey
cultivation (n.)
the act of raising or growing plants (especially on a large scale);
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.