Etymology
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crayfish (n.)

"small, freshwater lobster," early 14c., crevis, from Old French crevice, escrevice "crayfish" (13c., Modern French écrevisse), probably from Frankish *krebitja or a similar Germanic word that is a diminutive form of the root of crab (n.1); compare Old High German krebiz "crab, shellfish," German Krebs. Modern spelling is established from 16c., a folk-etymology alteration under influence of fish (n.).

updated on February 22, 2022

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Definitions of crayfish from WordNet

crayfish (n.)
warm-water lobsters without claws; those from Australia and South Africa usually marketed as frozen tails; caught also in Florida and California;
Synonyms: spiny lobster / langouste / rock lobster
crayfish (n.)
tiny lobster-like crustaceans usually boiled briefly;
Synonyms: crawfish / crawdad / ecrevisse
crayfish (n.)
small freshwater decapod crustacean that resembles a lobster;
Synonyms: crawfish / crawdad / crawdaddy
crayfish (n.)
large edible marine crustacean having a spiny carapace but lacking the large pincers of true lobsters;
Synonyms: spiny lobster / langouste / rock lobster / crawfish / sea crawfish
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.