Etymology
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crawl (v.)

c. 1200, creulen, "to move slowly by drawing the body across the ground," from a Scandinavian source, perhaps Old Norse krafla "to claw (one's way)," or Danish kravle, from the same root as crab (n.1). If there was an Old English *craflian, it has not been recorded.

Meaning "advance slowly" is from mid-15c. Sense of "have a sensation as of something crawling on the flesh" is from c. 1300. Related: Crawled; crawler; crawling.

crawl (n.)

1818, "act of crawling," from crawl (v.). In the swimming sense from 1903; the stroke was developed by Frederick Cavill, well-known English swimmer who emigrated to Australia and modified the standard stroke of the day after observing South Seas islanders. So called because the swimmer's motion in the water resembles crawling. Meaning "slow progress from one drinking place to another" is by 1883.

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Definitions of crawl
1
crawl (v.)
move slowly; in the case of people or animals with the body near the ground;
The crocodile was crawling along the riverbed
Synonyms: creep
crawl (v.)
feel as if crawling with insects;
My skin crawled--I was terrified
crawl (v.)
be full of;
The old cheese was crawling with maggots
crawl (v.)
show submission or fear;
Synonyms: fawn / creep / cringe / cower / grovel
crawl (v.)
swim by doing the crawl; "European children learn the breast stroke; they often don't know how to crawl";
2
crawl (n.)
a very slow movement;
the traffic advanced at a crawl
crawl (n.)
a swimming stroke; arms are moved alternately overhead accompanied by a flutter kick;
Synonyms: front crawl / Australian crawl
crawl (n.)
a slow mode of locomotion on hands and knees or dragging the body;
a crawl was all that the injured man could manage
Synonyms: crawling / creep / creeping
From wordnet.princeton.edu