Etymology
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cow (n.)

"female of a bovine animal," especially the domestic ox, Middle English cu, qu, kowh, from Old English cu "cow," from Proto-Germanic *kwon (source also of Old Frisian ku, Middle Dutch coe, Dutch koe, Old High German kuo, German Kuh, Old Norse kyr, Danish, Swedish ko), earlier *kwom, from PIE root *gwou- "ox, bull, cow."

Applied to the females of various large animals from late 14c. As an insulting or degrading word for a woman, 1690s.

cow (v.)

"intimidate, daunt the fear or courage of," c. 1600, probably [OED] from Old Norse kuga "oppress," which is of unknown origin but perhaps has something to do with the Scandinavian forms of cow (n.) on the notion of "easily herded." Related: Cowed; cowing.

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Definitions of cow
1
cow (n.)
female of domestic cattle: "`moo-cow' is a child's term";
Synonyms: moo-cow
cow (n.)
mature female of mammals of which the male is called `bull';
cow (n.)
a large unpleasant woman;
2
cow (v.)
subdue, restrain, or overcome by affecting with a feeling of awe; frighten (as with threats);
Synonyms: overawe
From wordnet.princeton.edu