Etymology
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count (v.)

late 14c., "to enumerate, assign numerals to successively and in order; repeat the numerals in order," also "to reckon among, include," from Old French conter "to count, add up," also "tell a story," from Latin computare "to count, sum up, reckon together," from com "with, together" (see com-) + putare "to reckon," originally "to prune," from PIE root *pau- (2) "to cut, strike, stamp."

Intransitive sense "be of value or worth" is from 1857. Related: Counted; counting. Modern French differentiates compter "to count" and conter "to tell," but they are cognates. To count on "rely or depend upon" is from 1640s. To count against (transitive) "to be to the disadvantage of" is by 1888. To count (someone) in "consider (someone) a participant or supporter" is from 1857; count (someone) out in the opposite sense "leave out of consideration" is from 1854.

Origin and meaning of count

count (n.1)

title of nobility in some continental nations, corresponding to English earl, c. 1300, from Anglo-French counte "count, earl" (Old French conte), from Latin comitem (nominative comes) "companion, attendant," the Roman term for a provincial governor, from com "with" (see com-) + stem of ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). The term was used in Anglo-French to render Old English eorl, but the word was never truly naturalized and mainly was used with reference to foreign titles.

In ancient Rome and the Roman empire, [a comes was] a companion of or attendant upon a great person; hence, the title of an adjutant to a proconsul or the like, afterward specifically of the immediate personal counselors of the emperor, and finally of many high officers, the most important of whom were the prototypes of the medieval counts. [Century Dictionary]

Origin and meaning of count

count (n.2)

early 14c., "a counting, a calculation," also "an account of money or property;" late 15c., "the total number, the total counted," from Anglo-French counte, Old French conte "a count, a reckoning, calculations," from conter "to count, add up," from Latin computare "to count, sum up, reckon together" (see compute).

Meaning "estimation, esteem, consideration" is from late 15c. In law, "each charge in an indictment," from 1580s. In boxing, "the counting by the referee of the 10 seconds allowed a fallen fighter to get up again," by 1902. In baseball and softball, "the number of strikes and balls thrown to a batter in a turn at the plate," by 1909.

Origin and meaning of count

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Definitions of count
1
count (v.)
determine the number or amount of;
Can you count the books on your shelf?
Synonyms: number / enumerate / numerate
count (v.)
have weight; have import, carry weight;
Synonyms: matter / weigh
count (v.)
show consideration for; take into account;
Synonyms: consider / weigh
count (v.)
name or recite the numbers in ascending order;
The toddler could count to 100
count (v.)
put into a group;
The academy counts several Nobel Prize winners among its members
Synonyms: number
count (v.)
include as if by counting;
I can count my colleagues in the opposition
count (v.)
have a certain value or carry a certain weight;
each answer counts as three points
count (v.)
have faith or confidence in;
you can count on me to help you any time
Synonyms: bet / depend / swear / rely / bank / look / calculate / reckon
count (v.)
take account of;
Synonyms: reckon
2
count (n.)
the total number counted;
a blood count
count (n.)
the act of counting; reciting numbers in ascending order;
the counting continued for several hours
count (n.)
a nobleman (in various countries) having rank equal to a British earl;
From wordnet.princeton.edu