Etymology
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Words related to corrupt

com- 
Origin and meaning of com-

word-forming element usually meaning "with, together," from Latin com, archaic form of classical Latin cum "together, together with, in combination," from PIE *kom- "beside, near, by, with" (compare Old English ge-, German ge-). The prefix in Latin sometimes was used as an intensive.

Before vowels and aspirates, it is reduced to co-; before -g-, it is assimilated to cog- or con-; before -l-, assimilated to col-; before -r-, assimilated to cor-; before -c-, -d-, -j-, -n-, -q-, -s-, -t-, and -v-, it is assimilated to con-, which was so frequent that it often was used as the normal form.

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abrupt (adj.)
Origin and meaning of abrupt

1580s, "sudden, unceremonious, without notice," a figurative use from Latin abruptus "broken off," also "precipitous, steep" (as a cliff), also "disconnected," past participle of abrumpere "break off," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + rumpere "to break," from a nasalized form of the PIE root *runp- "to snatch" (see corrupt (adj.)). The literal sense "broken off or appearing as if broken off" is from c. 1600 in English. Of writing, "having sudden transitions, lacking continuity," 1630s. Related: Abruptly; abruptness.

abruption (n.)
Origin and meaning of abruption

c. 1600, "a sudden breaking off," from Latin abruptionem (nominative abruptio) "a breaking off," noun of action from past-participle stem of abrumpere "break off," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + rumpere "to break," from a nasalized form of the PIE root *runp- "to break" (see corrupt (adj.)).

bereave (v.)

Middle English bireven, from Old English bereafian "to deprive of, take away by violence, seize, rob," from be- + reafian "rob, plunder," from Proto-Germanic *raubōjanan, from PIE *runp- "to break" (see corrupt (adj.)). A common Germanic formation (compare Old Frisian biravia "despoil, rob, deprive (someone of something)," Old Saxon biroban, Dutch berooven, Old High German biroubon, German berauben, Gothic biraubon).

Since mid-17c., mostly in reference to life, hope, loved ones, and other immaterial possessions. Past tense forms bereaved and bereft have co-existed since 14c., now slightly differentiated in meaning, the former applied to loss of loved ones, the latter to circumstances.

corruptible (adj.)

late 14c., of material things, "subject to decay or putrefaction, perishable," from Old French corroptible (14c.) or directly from Late Latin corruptibilis "liable to decay, corruptible," from past-participle stem of Latin corrumpere "to destroy; spoil," figuratively "corrupt, seduce, bribe" (see corrupt (adj.)).

Of persons, "susceptible of being changed for the worse, tending to moral corruption," mid-15c. As "open to bribery" from 1670s. Related: Susceptibility (late 15c.).

corruption (n.)

mid-14c., corrupcioun, of material things, especially dead bodies, "act of becoming putrid, dissolution, decay;" also of the soul, morals, etc., "spiritual contamination, depravity, wickedness," from Latin corruptionem (nominative corruptio) "a corruption, spoiling, seducing; a corrupt condition," noun of action from past-participle stem of corrumpere "to destroy; spoil," figuratively "corrupt, seduce, bribe" (see corrupt (adj.)).

Meaning "putrid matter" is from late 14c. Of public offices, "bribery or other depraving influence," from early 15c.; of language, "perversion, vitiation," from late 15c. Meaning "a corrupt form of a word" is from 1690s.

disrupt (v.)

"break or burst asunder, separate forcibly." 1650s, but rare before c. 1820, from Latin disruptus, past participle of disrumpere "break apart, split, shatter, break to pieces," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + rumpere "to break," from PIE root *runp- "to break" (see corrupt (adj.)). Or perhaps a back-formation from disruption. Earlier was disrump (1580s). Related: Disrupted; disrupting.

disruption (n.)

"a rending asunder, a bursting apart, forcible separation into parts," early 15c., originally medical, "laceration of tissue," general sense from 1640s, from Medieval Latin disruptionem (nominative disruptio) "a breaking asunder," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin disrumpere "break apart, split, shatter, break to pieces," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + rumpere "to break," from PIE root *runp- "to break" (see corrupt (adj.)).

incorruptible (adj.)

mid-14c.,  of matter, "imperishable;" of the soul, etc., "immortal, everlasting," from Old French incorruptible (14c.), or directly from Late Latin incorruptibilis "incorruptible," from Latin incorruptus "unspoiled, unseduced," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + corruptus, past participle of corrumpere "to destroy; spoil," figuratively "corrupt, seduce, bribe" (see corrupt (adj.)). From 1660s in English as "not corruptible morally," especially with reference to taking bribes, etc. Related: Incorruptibly.

interrupt (v.)
c. 1400, "to interfere with a legal right," from Latin interruptus, past participle of interrumpere "break apart, break off, break through," from inter "between" (see inter-) + rumpere "to break" (see rupture (n.), and compare corrupt (adj.)). Meaning "to break into, break in upon, disturb the action of" (especially of speech) is from early 15c. in English (it is also in Latin). Related: Interrupted; interrupting.