Etymology
Advertisement

corner (n.)

late 13c., "place where streets or walls meet;" early 14c., "intersection of any two converging lines or surfaces; an angle," from Anglo-French cornere (Old French corner, corniere), from Old French corne "horn; corner," from Vulgar Latin *corna, from Latin cornua, plural of cornu "horn, hard growth on the head of many mammals," from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head."

Latin cornu was used of pointed or stiff things but not of corners, for which angulus was the word. Meaning "a region or district" is from late 14c.; the four corners of the known earth is from late 14c. Sense of "either of the places where the upper and lower eyelids meet" is from late 14c. Meaning "a small, secret, or retired place" is from late 14c.

In boxing, from 1853. In soccer, short for corner-kick, by 1882. Sense of "a monopolizing of the market supply of a stock or commodity" is from 1853. As an adjective, from 1530s. Corner-shop is from late 13c.

To turn the corner "change direction," literally or figuratively, is from 1680s. To be just around the corner in the extended sense of "about to happen" is by 1905. To cut corners is by 1847 as "pass round a corner or corners as closely as possible;" figurative use, in reference to an easy or economical but risky course of action, is by 1882.

corner (v.)

late 14c., "to furnish with corners; bring to a point by convergence," from corner (n.). Meaning "to turn a corner," as in a race, is from 1860s. Meaning "drive or force (someone) into a corner," also figuratively, "force into a position where defeat or surrender is inevitable," is American English from 1824; commercial sense "monopolize the market supply of a stock or commodity" is from 1836. Related: Cornered; cornering.

Others are reading

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of corner
1
corner (n.)
a place off to the side of an area;
he tripled to the rightfield corner
the southeastern corner of the Mediterranean
corner (n.)
the point where two lines meet or intersect;
the corners of a rectangle
corner (n.)
an interior angle formed by two meeting walls;
a piano was in one corner of the room
Synonyms: nook
corner (n.)
the intersection of two streets;
standing on the corner watching all the girls go by
Synonyms: street corner / turning point
corner (n.)
the point where three areas or surfaces meet or intersect;
the corners of a cube
corner (n.)
a small concavity;
Synonyms: recess / recession / niche
corner (n.)
a temporary monopoly on a kind of commercial trade;
a corner on the silver market
corner (n.)
a predicament from which a skillful or graceful escape is impossible;
his lying got him into a tight corner
Synonyms: box
corner (n.)
a projecting part where two sides or edges meet;
he knocked off the corners
corner (n.)
a remote area;
in many corners of the world they still practice slavery
corner (n.)
(architecture) solid exterior angle of a building; especially one formed by a cornerstone;
Synonyms: quoin
2
corner (v.)
gain control over;
corner the gold market
corner (v.)
force a person or an animal into a position from which he cannot escape;
Synonyms: tree
corner (v.)
turn a corner;
the car corners
From wordnet.princeton.edu