Etymology
Advertisement

corduroy (n.)

"thick, cotton stuff with a corded or ridged surface," 1774, probably from cord + obsolete 17c. duroy, name of a coarse fabric made in England, which is of unknown origin. Folk etymology is from *corde du roi "the king's cord," but this is not attested in French, where the term for the cloth was velours à côtes. As an adjective from 1789. Applied in U.S. to a road of logs across swampy ground (1780s) on similarity of appearance.

CORDUROY ROAD. A road or causeway constructed with logs laid together over swamps or marshy places. When properly finished earth is thrown between them by which the road is made smooth; but in newly settled parts of the United States they are often left uncovered, and hence are extremely rough and bad to pass over with a carriage. Sometimes they extend many miles. They derive their name from their resemblance to a species of ribbed velvet, called corduroy. [Bartlett]

Others are reading

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of corduroy
1
corduroy (n.)
a road made of logs laid crosswise;
corduroy (n.)
a cut pile fabric with vertical ribs; usually made of cotton;
Synonyms: cord
2
corduroy (v.)
build (a road) from logs laid side by side;
From wordnet.princeton.edu