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coordinate (adj.)

1640s, "of the same order, belonging to the same rank or degree," from Medieval Latin coordinatus, past participle of coordinare "to set in order, arrange," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see com-) + ordinatio "arrangement," from ordo "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Meaning "involving coordination" is from 1769. Related: Coordinance.

coordinate (n.)

also co-ordinate, 1823, in the mathematical sense ("each of two or more magnitudes used to define the position of a point, line, or plane"), especially with reference to the system invented by Descartes; from coordinate (adj.).

Hence, coordinates as a means of determining a location on the earth's surface (especially for aircraft), attested by 1960. The meaning "something of the same order, degree, or rank with another or others" is from 1850. In women's fashion, coordinates "set of matched clothing" is attested by 1959.

coordinate (v.)

also co-ordinate, 1660s, "to place in the same rank," from Latin coordinare "to set in order, arrange," from co- "with, together" (see com-) + ordinatio "arrangement," from ordo "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)).

Meaning "to arrange in proper position relative to each other" (transitive) is from 1847; that of "to work together in order" (intransitive) is from 1863. Related: Coordinated; coordinating.

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