Etymology
Advertisement

conversion (n.)

mid-14c., originally of religion, "a radical and complete change in spirit, purpose, and direction of life away from sin and toward love of God," from Old French conversion "change, transformation, entry into religious life; way of life, behavior; dwelling, residence; sexual intercourse," from Latin conversionem (nominative conversio) "a turning round, revolving; alteration, change," noun of action from past-participle stem of convertere "to turn around; to transform," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + vertere "to turn" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend").

Sense of "a change from one religion to another" (especially to Christianity) is from c. 1400 in English. General sense of "transformation, a turning or changing from one state to another" is from early 15c. In reference to the use of a building, from 1921. Conversion disorder "hysteria" (attested from 1946 but said to have been coined by Freud) was in DSM-IV (1994). Conversion therapy in reference to homosexuality is by 1979.

Others are reading

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of conversion

conversion (n.)
an event that results in a transformation;
Synonyms: transition / changeover
conversion (n.)
a change in the units or form of an expression: "conversion from Fahrenheit to Centigrade";
conversion (n.)
a successful free throw or try for point after a touchdown;
conversion (n.)
a spiritual enlightenment causing a person to lead a new life;
Synonyms: rebirth / spiritual rebirth
conversion (n.)
(psychiatry) a defense mechanism represses emotional conflicts which are then converted into physical symptoms that have no organic basis;
conversion (n.)
a change of religion;
his conversion to the Catholic faith
conversion (n.)
interchange of subject and predicate of a proposition;
conversion (n.)
act of exchanging one type of money or security for another;
conversion (n.)
the act of changing from one use or function or purpose to another;
From wordnet.princeton.edu