Etymology
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contractor (n.)

1540s, "one who enters into a contract," from Late Latin contractor "one who makes a contract," agent noun from past-participle stem of Latin contrahere "to draw several objects together; draw in, shorten, lessen, abridge," metaphorically "make a bargain, make an agreement," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + trahere "to draw" (see tract (n.1)).

From 1680s as "a muscle which contracts a part." Specifically "one who enters into a contract to provide work, services, or goods at a certain price or rate" is from 1724.

updated on March 16, 2018

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Definitions of contractor from WordNet

contractor (n.)
someone (a person or firm) who contracts to build things;
contractor (n.)
the bridge player in contract bridge who wins the bidding and can declare which suit is to be trumps;
Synonyms: declarer
contractor (n.)
(law) a party to a contract;
contractor (n.)
a bodily organ that contracts;
Synonyms: contractile organ
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.