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content (adj.)

c. 1400, literally "held or contained within limits," hence "having the desire limited to present enjoyments," from Old French content, "satisfied," from Latin contentus "contained, satisfied," past participle of continere "to hold together, enclose," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + tenere "to hold" (from PIE root *ten- "to stretch"). Related: Contently (largely superseded by contentedly).

content (n.1)

"state of mind which results from satisfaction with present circumstances," 1570s, from content (adj.). Phrase heart's content is from 1590s (Shakespeare).

content (n.2)

"that which is contained;" see contents.

content (v.)

early 15c., "to rest or be satisfied; to give satisfaction to," from Old French contenter (from content (adj.) "satisfied") and Medieval Latin contentare, both from Latin contentus "contained; satisfied," past participle of continere "to hold together, enclose," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + tenere "to hold" (from PIE root *ten- "to stretch").

Sense connection of "contained" and "satisfied" probably is that the contented person's desires are bound by what he or she already has. Related: Contented; contenting.