Etymology
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Words related to contempt

com- 
Origin and meaning of com-

word-forming element usually meaning "with, together," from Latin com, archaic form of classical Latin cum "together, together with, in combination," from PIE *kom- "beside, near, by, with" (compare Old English ge-, German ge-). The prefix in Latin sometimes was used as an intensive.

Before vowels and aspirates, it is reduced to co-; before -g-, it is assimilated to cog- or con-; before -l-, assimilated to col-; before -r-, assimilated to cor-; before -c-, -d-, -j-, -n-, -q-, -s-, -t-, and -v-, it is assimilated to con-, which was so frequent that it often was used as the normal form.

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contemn (v.)

mid-15c., contempnen, "to slight or spurn," from Old French contemner (15c.) or directly from Latin contemnere "to despise, scorn, consider (something or someone) as of small value," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + *temnere "to slight, scorn," which is of uncertain origin (see contempt). Of laws, agreements, etc., "consider and treat as contemptible," 1570s. Related: Contemned; contemning.

contemptible (adj.)

late 14c., "despicable, worthy of contempt," also "lowly, humble, unworthy," from Late Latin contemptibilis "worthy of scorn," from contempt-, past-participle stem of Latin contemnere "to scorn, despise," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + *temnere "to slight, scorn," which is of uncertain origin (see contempt). Related: Contemptibility; contemptibly; contemptibleness.

Contemptible is unworthy of notice, deserving of scorn, for littleness or meanness; it is generally not so strong as despicable, which always involves the idea of great baseness; as a contemptible trick; despicable treachery. [Century Dictionary]
contemptuous (adj.)

"manifesting or expressing contempt," 1590s, from Latin contemptus (see contempt) + -ous. Related: Contemptuously (1520s); contemptuousness.