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consummate (adj.)

c. 1500, "complete, perfect, carried to the utmost extent or degree," from Latin consummatus "perfected, complete," past participle of consummare "sum up, complete," from assimilated form of com "together, with" (see con-) + summa "sum, total," from summus "highest" (see sum (n.)). Of persons, "accomplished, very qualified," from 1640s. Related: Consummately.

consummate (v.)

mid-15c., "to bring to completion, finish by completing what was intended," from Latin consummatus, past participle of consummare "to sum up, make up, complete, finish," from assimilated form of com "together, with" (see con-) + summa "sum, total," from summus "highest" (see sum (n.)).

Meaning "to bring a marriage to completion" (by sexual intercourse) is from 1530s. Related: Consummated; consummating.