Etymology
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Words related to consolidate

con- 

word-forming element meaning "together, with," sometimes merely intensive; it is the form of com- used in Latin before consonants except -b-, -p-, -l-, -m-, or -r-. In native English formations (such as costar), co- tends to be used where Latin would use con-.

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*sol- 

also solə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "whole, well-kept." 

It forms all or part of: catholic; consolidate; consolidation; holism; holo-; holocaust; Holocene; hologram; holograph; insouciant; safe; safety; sage (n.1) kind of herb; salubrious; salutary; salute; salvage; salvific; salvo "simultaneous discharge of guns;" save (v.) "deliver from danger;" save (prep.) "except;" solder; soldier; solemn; solicit; solicitous; solid; solidarity; solidity; sou.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit sarvah "uninjured, intact, whole;" Avestan haurva- "uninjured, intact;" Old Persian haruva-; Greek holos "whole;" Latin salvus "uninjured, in good health, safe," salus "good health," solidus "solid;" Armenian olj "whole, healthy."  

consolidated (adj.)

"made firm, solid, hard, or compact," 1736, past-participle adjective from consolidate. Of bills in parliament, 1741; of money, debt, etc., 1753.

console (n.)

1706, "a cabinet; an ornamental base structure," from French console "a bracket" (16c.), which is of uncertain origin, possibly from consolateur, literally "one who consoles" (see console (v.)), being used somehow for carved human figures supporting cornices, shelves or rails in choir stalls. Another guess connects it to Latin consolidare "to make solid" (see consolidate).

The sense evolved to "body of a musical organ" (1881), "radio cabinet" (1925), then "cabinet for a TV, stereo, etc." (1944). Console-table is attested from 1813.