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console (v.)

"alleviate the grief or mental distress of," 1690s, from French consoler "to comfort, console," from Latin consolari "offer solace, encourage, comfort, cheer," from assimilated form of com-, here probably an intensive prefix (see com-), + solari "to comfort" (see solace). Or perhaps a back-formation from consolation. The Latin word is glossed in Old English by frefran. Related: Consoled; consoling.

console (n.)

1706, "a cabinet; an ornamental base structure," from French console "a bracket" (16c.), which is of uncertain origin, possibly from consolateur, literally "one who consoles" (see console (v.)), being used somehow for carved human figures supporting cornices, shelves or rails in choir stalls. Another guess connects it to Latin consolidare "to make solid" (see consolidate).

The sense evolved to "body of a musical organ" (1881), "radio cabinet" (1925), then "cabinet for a TV, stereo, etc." (1944). Console-table is attested from 1813.

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Definitions of console from WordNet
1
console (n.)
a small table fixed to a wall or designed to stand against a wall;
Synonyms: console table
console (n.)
a scientific instrument consisting of displays and an input device that an operator can use to monitor and control a system (especially a computer system);
console (n.)
an ornamental scroll-shaped bracket (especially one used to support a wall fixture);
the bust of Napoleon stood on a console
console (n.)
housing for electronic instruments, as radio or television;
Synonyms: cabinet
2
console (v.)
give moral or emotional strength to;
Synonyms: comfort / soothe / solace
From wordnet.princeton.edu