Etymology
Advertisement

Words related to connive

con- 

word-forming element meaning "together, with," sometimes merely intensive; it is the form of com- used in Latin before consonants except -b-, -p-, -l-, -m-, or -r-. In native English formations (such as costar), co- tends to be used where Latin would use con-.

Advertisement
nictitate (v.)

"to wink," 1822, from Medieval Latin nictitatus, past participle of nictitare, frequentative of Latin nictare "wink, blink, signal with the eyes," related to nicere "to beckon," from PIE root *kneigwh- "to blink, to draw together (the eyes or eyelids)," source also of Gothic hniewan, Old High German nigan "to bow, be inclined." Related: Nictitated; nictitating (1713). Earlier form was nictate (v.), 1690s, from Latin nictare.

connivence (n.)

"act of conniving, an overlooking of a disreputable or illegal action, often implying private approval," especially, in divorce law, "corrupt consent of a married person to that conduct of the spouse of which complaint is later made," 1590s, from French connivence or directly from Latin conniventia, from conniventem (nominative connivens), present participle of connivere "to wink," hence, "to wink at (a crime), be secretly privy" (see connive). According to OED, the spelling with -a- prevailed after early 18c. but is unetymological.

connivent (adj.)

1640s, "willfully blind or tolerant," from Latin conniventem (nominative connivens), present participle of connivere "to wink," hence, "to wink at (a crime), be secretly privy" (see connive). In natural history, "having a gradually inward direction, gradually convergent," 1757.

conniving (adj.)

"willfully blind or tolerant," 1783, present-participle adjective from connive. Earlier in this sense was connivent.