Etymology
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conjure (v.)

late 13c., "command on oath;" c. 1300, "summon by a sacred name, invoke by incantation or magic," from Old French conjurer "invoke, conjure" (12c.) and directly from Latin coniurare "to swear together; conspire," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iurare "to swear," from ius (genitive iuris) "law, an oath" (see jurist).

The magical sense is from the notion of "constraining by spell" a demon to do one's bidding. Related: Conjured; conjuring. Phrase conjure up "cause to appear in the mind" (as if by magic) attested from 1580s.

updated on November 18, 2018

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Definitions of conjure from WordNet

conjure (v.)
summon into action or bring into existence, often as if by magic;
he conjured wild birds in the air
Synonyms: raise / conjure up / invoke / evoke / stir / call down / arouse / bring up / put forward / call forth
conjure (v.)
ask for or request earnestly;
Synonyms: bid / beseech / entreat / adjure / press
conjure (v.)
engage in plotting or enter into a conspiracy, swear together;
Synonyms: conspire / cabal / complot / machinate
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.