Etymology
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conjunctive (adj.)

mid-15c., originally in the grammatical sense," from Latin coniunctivus "serving to connect," from coniunctus, past participle of coniungere "to join together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iungere "to join together" (from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join").

The conjunctive mode (Late Latin coniunctivus modus) is the mode which follows a conditional conjunction or expresses contingency; more commonly it is called subjunctive. Non-grammatical sense of "connecting, uniting, solidifying" is from late 15c.  Meaning "closely connected" is from c. 1600. Related: Conjunctively.

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Definitions of conjunctive
1
conjunctive (adj.)
serving or tending to connect;
conjunctive (adj.)
involving the joint activity of two or more;
the conjunctive focus of political opposition
2
conjunctive (n.)
an uninflected function word that serves to conjoin words or phrases or clauses or sentences;
Synonyms: conjunction / connective / continuative
From wordnet.princeton.edu