Etymology
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conjugate (v.)

1520s, in the grammatical sense, "inflect (a verb) through all its various forms," from Latin coniugatus, past participle of coniugare "to yoke together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iugare "to join," from iugum "yoke" (from PIE root *yeug- "to join"). "This use has its origin in the fact that in inflected languages, a verb is conjugated by conjoining certain inflectional syllables with the root" [Century Dictionary]. Earlier as an adjective, "joined together" (late 15c.). Related: Conjugated; conjugating.

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Definitions of conjugate
1
conjugate (adj.)
joined together especially in a pair or pairs;
Synonyms: conjugated / coupled
conjugate (adj.)
(of a pinnate leaflet) having only one pair of leaflets;
conjugate (adj.)
formed by the union of two compounds;
a conjugated protein
Synonyms: conjugated
conjugate (adj.)
of an organic compound; containing two or more double bonds each separated from the other by a single bond;
Synonyms: conjugated
2
conjugate (v.)
unite chemically so that the product is easily broken down into the original compounds;
conjugate (v.)
add inflections showing person, number, gender, tense, aspect, etc.;
conjugate the verb
conjugate (v.)
undergo conjugation;
3
conjugate (n.)
a mixture of two partially miscible liquids A and B produces two conjugate solutions: one of A in B and another of B in A;
Synonyms: conjugate solution
From wordnet.princeton.edu