Etymology
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Words related to congress

con- 

word-forming element meaning "together, with," sometimes merely intensive; it is the form of com- used in Latin before consonants except -b-, -p-, -l-, -m-, or -r-. In native English formations (such as costar), co- tends to be used where Latin would use con-.

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*ghredh- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to walk, go." 

It forms all or part of: aggress; aggression; aggressive; centigrade; congress; degrade; degree; degression; digress; digression; egress; gradation; grade; gradual; graduate; grallatorial; gravigrade; ingredient; ingress; plantigrade; progress; progression; regress; regression; retrograde; retrogress; tardigrade; transgress; transgression.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin gradus "a step, a pace, gait," figuratively "a step toward something, a degree of something rising by stages;" gradi "to walk, step, go;" Lithuanian gridiju, gridyti "to go, wander;" Old Church Slavonic gredo "to come;" Old Irish in-greinn "he pursues."  

congressional (adj.)

"of or pertaining to a congress," 1690s, from Latin congressionem (from congressus, see congress) + -al (1); specifically "of or pertaining to the Congress of the American states" from 1776. As such the word was at first reviled as barbarous, but Pickering (1816) quotes an unnamed English correspondent: "The term Congress belonging to America, the Americans may employ its derivatives, without waiting for the assent of the English."

congressman (n.)

1780, in reference to members of U.S. Congress, and it first appears in a piece of abuse (written by a Loyalist):

Ye coxcomb Congressmen, declaimers keen,
Brisk puppets of the Philadelphia scene ...

Technically of members of both the Senate and the House of Representatives, but typically meaning only the House members. Congresswoman attested from 1918 (Jeannette Rankin (1880-1973) was the first).