Etymology
Advertisement

congener (n.)

"a thing of the same kind as, or nearly allied to, another," 1730s, from French congénère (16c.), from Latin congener "of the same race or kind," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + gener-, stem of genus "race, kind" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups). Related: Congenerous (1640s); congeneracy.

updated on March 01, 2018

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of congener from WordNet

congener (n.)
a minor chemical constituent that gives a wine or liquor its distinctive character;
congener (n.)
an animal or plant that bears a relationship to another (as related by common descent or by membership in the same genus);
Synonyms: relative / congenator / congeneric
congener (n.)
a whole (a thing or person) of the same kind or category as another;
the American shopkeeper differs from his European congener
lard was also used, though its congener, butter, was more frequently employed
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.