Etymology
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conduit (n.)

c. 1300, conduyt, "conduct, guidance, an escorting party" (a sense now obsolete in this word but preserved in its doublet, conduct), from Old French conduit (12c.) "escort, protection; pipe, channel," from Latin conductus "a leading, a pipe," noun use of past participle of conducere "to lead or bring together; contribute, serve," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead").

Conduct and conduit differentiated in meaning from 15c. Conduit in the sense "medium or means of conveying" is from mid-14c.; as "pipe or tube or other channel for conveyance of water," late 14c.

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Definitions of conduit

conduit (n.)
a passage (a pipe or tunnel) through which water or electric wires can pass;
the computers were connected through a system of conduits
From wordnet.princeton.edu