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condemn (v.)

early 14c., condempnen "to blame, censure;" mid-14c., "pronounce judgment against," from Old French condamner, condemner "to condemn" (11c.) and directly from Latin condemnare, condempnare "to sentence, doom, blame, disapprove," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + damnare "to harm, damage" (see damn (v.)). Replaced Old English fordeman.

From late 14c. as "hold to be reprehensible or intolerable," also "afford occasion for condemnation, bear witness against." From 1705 as "adjudge or pronounce as forfeited" (as a prize of war, etc.); from 1833, American English, in the sense of "to judicially take (land, etc.) for potential public use." From 1745 as "judge or pronounce (a building, etc.) to be unfit for use or service." Related: Condemned; condemning.

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Definitions of condemn from WordNet

condemn (v.)
express strong disapproval of;
We condemn the racism in South Africa
condemn (v.)
declare or judge unfit for use or habitation;
The building was condemned by the inspector
condemn (v.)
compel or force into a particular state or activity;
His devotion to his sick wife condemned him to a lonely existence
condemn (v.)
demonstrate the guilt of (someone);
Her strange behavior condemned her
condemn (v.)
pronounce a sentence on (somebody) in a court of law;
He was condemned to ten years in prison
Synonyms: sentence / doom
condemn (v.)
appropriate (property) for public use;
the county condemned the land to build a highway
From wordnet.princeton.edu