Etymology
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commonplace (n.)

1540s, "a statement generally accepted," a literal translation of Latin locus communis, itself a translation of Greek koinos topos "general topic," in logic, "general theme applicable to many particular cases." See common (adj.) + place (n.). Meaning "memorandum of something that is likely to be again referred to, striking or notable passage" is from 1560s; hence commonplace-book (1570s) in which such were written down. Meaning "well-known, customary, or obvious remark; statement regularly made on certain occasions" is from 1550s. The adjectival sense of "having nothing original" dates from c. 1600.

updated on July 06, 2020

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Definitions of commonplace from WordNet
1
commonplace (adj.)
repeated too often; overfamiliar through overuse;
his remarks were trite and commonplace
Synonyms: banal / hackneyed / old-hat / shopworn / stock / threadbare / timeworn / tired / trite / well-worn
commonplace (adj.)
completely ordinary and unremarkable;
commonplace everyday activities
air travel has now become commonplace
commonplace (adj.)
not challenging; dull and lacking excitement;
Synonyms: humdrum / prosaic / unglamorous / unglamourous
2
commonplace (n.)
a trite or obvious remark;
Synonyms: platitude / cliche / banality / bromide
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.