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cocoon (n.)

"sikly envelop which the larvae of many insects spin as a covering while they are in the crysalis state," 1690s, from French coucon (16c., Modern French cocon), from coque "clam shell, egg shell, nut shell," from Old French coque "shell," from Latin coccum "berry," from Greek kokkos "berry, seed" (see cocco-). The sense of "one's interior comfort place" is from 1986. Also see -oon.

cocoon (v.)

1850, of insects, "to form a cocoon," from cocoon (n.). Figurative use, in reference to persons bundled up or wrapped up in anything, 1873. Modern sense "to stay inside and be inactive" is from 1986. Related: Cocooned; cocooning.

A lady with an enchanting name, Faith Popcorn, has identified a menacing new American behavior that she gives the sweet name of 'cocooning.' It threatens the nation's pursuit of happiness, sometimes called the economy. [George Will, April 1987]

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Definitions of cocoon from WordNet
1
cocoon (v.)
retreat as if into a cocoon, as from an unfriendly environment;
She loves to stay at home and cocoon
Families cocoon around the T.V. set most evenings
cocoon (v.)
wrap in or as if in a cocoon, as for protection;
2
cocoon (n.)
silky envelope spun by the larvae of many insects to protect pupas and by spiders to protect eggs;
From wordnet.princeton.edu

Dictionary entries near cocoon

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