Etymology
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Words related to cock

cockade (n.)

"clasp, button, etc. used to secure the cock of a hat," hence "any knot or badge worn on a hat," especially as a sign of political adherence, 1709, earlier cockard (1650s), from French cocarde (16c.), fem. of cocard (Old French cocart) "foolishly proud, cocky," as a noun, "idiot, fool;" an allusive extension from coq (see cock (n.1)).

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cock-a-doodle-doo (n.)

"sound made by a crowing cock," 1570s, imitative; compare French cocorico, German kikeriki, Latin cucurire, Russian kikareku, Vietnamese cuc-cu, Arabic ko-ko, etc., and compare cock (n.1).

cockatoo (n.)

name given to various birds of the parrot family, 1610s, from Dutch kaketoe, from Malay (Austronesian) kakatua, possibly echoic, or from kakak "elder brother or sister" + tua "old." Also cockatiel, cockateel (1863), from Dutch diminutive kaketielje (1850), which is perhaps influenced by Portuguese. Spelling influenced by cock (n.1).

cockchafer (n.)

popular name of a common European beetle, the May-beetle, 1690s, from cock (n.1), in reference to its size, + chafer "beetle."

cock-crow (n.)

"dawn of the day," mid-15c., from cock (n.1) + crow (v.). An Old English word on a similar notion was hanered.

cocker (n.)

"spaniel dog trained to start woodcock and snipe in woods and marshes," 1811, from cock (n.1).

cockerel (n.)

"young domestic cock" (up to 1 year old), mid-15c. (late 12c. as a surname), apparently a diminutive of cock (n.1). Despite the form, no evidence that it is from French.

cockpit (n.)

1580s, "a pit or enclosed space for fighting cocks," from cock (n.1) + pit (n.1). Used in nautical sense (1706) for midshipmen's compartment below decks; transferred to airplanes (1914) and to racing cars (1930s).

cockscomb (n.)
c. 1400, "comb or crest of a cock," from possessive of cock (n.1) + comb (n.). Meaning "cap worn by a professional fool" is from 1560s; hence "conceited fool" (1560s), a sense passing into the derivative coxcomb. As a plant name, from 1570s.
cockspur (n.)

"sharp spur on the leg of a male gallinaceous bird," 1590s, from cock (n.1) + spur (n.).

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