Etymology
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Words related to co-

com- 
Origin and meaning of com-

word-forming element usually meaning "with, together," from Latin com, archaic form of classical Latin cum "together, together with, in combination," from PIE *kom- "beside, near, by, with" (compare Old English ge-, German ge-). The prefix in Latin sometimes was used as an intensive.

Before vowels and aspirates, it is reduced to co-; before -g-, it is assimilated to cog- or con-; before -l-, assimilated to col-; before -r-, assimilated to cor-; before -c-, -d-, -j-, -n-, -q-, -s-, -t-, and -v-, it is assimilated to con-, which was so frequent that it often was used as the normal form.

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cache (n.)
1797, "hiding place," from French Canadian trappers' slang, "hiding place for stores and provisions" (1660s), a back-formation from French cacher "to hide, conceal" (13c., Old French cachier), from Vulgar Latin *coacticare "store up, collect, compress," frequentative of Latin coactare "constrain," from coactus, past participle of cogere "to collect," literally "to drive together," from com- "together" (see co-) + agere "to set in motion, drive; to do, perform" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move"). Sense extended by 1830s to "anything stored in a hiding place."
co-act (v.)

"to act together," c. 1600, from co- + act (v.). Related: Co-action; co-active; co-actor.

coadaptation (n.)

also co-adaptation, "mutual or reciprocal adaptation," 1803, from co- + adaptation.

coadjacent (adj.)

also co-adjacent, "mutually adjacent," 1842, from co- + adjacent. Related: Coadjacence.

coalesce (v.)

1540s, "grow together, unite by growing into one body," from Latin coalescere "unite, grow together, become one in growth," from assimilated form of com- "together" (see co-) + alescere "be nourished," hence, "increase, grow up," inchoative of alere "to suckle, nourish," from PIE root *al- (2) "to grow, nourish." Related: Coalesced; coalescing; coalescence; coalescent.

coarticulation (n.)

"mutual or reciprocal articulation," 1610s, from co- + articulation.

co-author (n.)

also coauthor, "one who writes (a book, journal article, etc.) along with another," 1850, from co- + author (n.). From 1948 as a verb. Related: Co-authored; co-authoring.

coaxial (adj.)

also co-axial, "having a common axis," 1850 as a term in mathematics; the coaxial cable, one containing several coaxial lines, is attested by that name from 1934. See co- + axial. Earlier coaxal (1847). Related: Coaxially; coaxiation.

co-belligerent (n.)

"one who is mutually at war" (as distinguished from an ally), 1813, a word from the Napoleonic wars, from co- + belligerent. As an adjective, "carrying on war in conjunction with another power," from 1828.