Etymology
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Words related to club

clump (n.)

1580s, "lump; cluster or small, close group" (especially of shrubs or trees), from Middle English clompe "a lump" (c. 1300), from a Low German source (such as Dutch klomp "lump, mass," or Middle Low German klumpe "clog, wooden shoe"). Old English had clympre "lump, mass of metal."

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ball-club (n.)
also ballclub, "association of players of a ball game," 1845, from ball (n.1) + club (n.) in the "social organization" sense.
clubbable (adj.)

"having qualities that make one fit to be a member of a social club," 1783, from club (n.) + -able.

clubbed (adj.)

late 14c., "shaped like a club, thick at the end," from club (n.). Specifically of defects of the foot by c. 1500; meaning "formed into a club" is from 1620s.

clubby (adj.)
"of a social disposition," 1859, from club (n.) in the associative sense + -y (2). Related: Clubbily; clubbiness.
club-fist (n.)

1570s, "a large fist," hence, "a brutal fellow," from club (n.) + fist (n.). Related: Club-fisted.

club-foot (n.)

also clubfoot, "deformed foot," 1530s, from club (n.) + foot (n.). Related: Club-footed.

club-house (n.)

also clubhouse, "place of meeting and refreshment always open to those who are members of the club," 1805, from club (n.) in the associative sense + house (n.). Clubhouse lawyer is baseball slang by 1940s.

club-moss (n.)

1590s, from club (n.) + moss. So called for the club shape of its upright spore-cases.

nightclub (n.)
also night-club, "club open at night," 1894, from night + club (n.) in the social sense.