Etymology
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clash (v.)

c. 1500, "to make a loud, sharp sound," of imitative origin, or a blend of clap and crash. Compare Dutch kletsen "splash, clash," German klatschen, Danish klaske "clash, knock about." Figurative sense, in reference to non-physical strife or battle, is first attested 1620s. Of things, "to come into collision," from 1650s; of colors, "to go badly together," by 1867. Related: Clashed; clashing.

clash (n.)

1510s, "sharp, loud noise of collision," from clash (v.). Especially of the noise of conflicting metal weapons. Meaning "hostile encounter" is from 1640s; meaning "conflict of opinions, etc." is from 1781.

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Definitions of clash
1
clash (n.)
a loud resonant repeating noise;
Synonyms: clang / clangor / clangour / clangoring / clank / crash
clash (n.)
a state of conflict between persons;
Synonyms: friction
clash (n.)
a state of conflict between colors;
her dress was a disturbing clash of colors
clash (n.)
a minor short-term fight;
Synonyms: brush / encounter / skirmish
2
clash (v.)
crash together with violent impact;
Two meteors clashed
Synonyms: collide
clash (v.)
be incompatible; be or come into conflict;
These colors clash
Synonyms: jar / collide
clash (v.)
disagree violently;
We clashed over the new farm policies
From wordnet.princeton.edu