Etymology
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Words related to cheer

*ker- (1)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "horn; head," with derivatives referring to horned animals, horn-shaped objects, and projecting parts.

It forms all or part of: alpenhorn; Capricorn; carat; carotid; carrot; carotene; cerato-; cerebellum; cerebral; cerebrum; cervical; cervix; charivari; cheer; chelicerae; corn (n.2) "hardening of the skin;" cornea; corner; cornet; cornucopia; cranium; flugelhorn; hart; hartebeest; horn; hornbeam; hornblende; hornet; keratin; kerato-; migraine; monoceros; reindeer; rhinoceros; saveloy; serval; triceratops; unicorn.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit srngam "horn;" Persian sar "head," Avestan sarah- "head;" Greek karnon "horn," koryne "club, mace," koryphe "head;" Latin cornu "horn," cervus "deer;" Old English horn "horn of an animal;" Welsh carw "deer."

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chear 
obsolete spelling of cheer (n.).
cheerful (adj.)

c. 1400, "full of cheer, having good spirits," from cheer (n.) + -ful. Meaning "elevating the spirits" is from mid-15c. Related: Cheerfully; cheerfulness.

cheerio (interj.)

upbeat parting exclamation, British, 1896 as cheero; 1918 as cheerio; from cheer. The breakfast cereal Cheerios debuted in 1941 as CheeriOats; the name was shortened in 1945.

cheerleader (n.)
also cheer-leader, 1900, American English, from cheer (n.) + leader. Cheerleading is attested from 1906.
cheerless (adj.)

"devoid of comfort, without joy," 1570s, from cheer (n.) + -less. Related: Cheerlessly; cheerlessness.

cheers 
salute or toast when taking a drink, British, 1919, from plural of cheer (also see cheerio). Earlier it is recorded as a shout of support or encouragement (1720).
cheery (adj.)

"showing good spirits," mid-15c., from cheer (n.) + -y (2). The colloquial alternative to cheerful. Related: Cheerily; cheeriness.