Etymology
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chastise (v.)

"to inflict pain upon to punish and recall to duty, to punish for the purpose of correcting or reclaiming," c. 1300, chastisen, from Old French chastiier "to warn, advise, instruct; chastise, admonish; punish; dominate, tame" (12c., Modern French châtier), from Latin castigare "to set or keep right, to reprove, chasten, to punish," literally "to make pure" (see castigate). Or perhaps from Middle English chastien (see chasten) + -ise, though this would be early for such a native formation. The form of the modern word "is not easily accounted for" [OED]. Related: Chastised; chastising.

He alone may chastise who loves. [Rabindranath Tagore, "The Crescent Moon," 1913]

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Definitions of chastise

chastise (v.)
censure severely;
She chastised him for his insensitive remarks
From wordnet.princeton.edu