Etymology
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chant (v.)

late 14c., "to sing," from Old French chanter "to sing, celebrate" (12c.), from Latin cantare "to sing," originally frequentative of canere "sing" (which it replaced), from PIE root *kan- "to sing."

The frequentative quality of the word was no longer felt in Latin, and by the time French emerged the word had entirely displaced canere. Meaning "to sing as in the church service, in a style between song and recitation" is by 1580s. Related: Chanted; chanting.

chant (n.)

1670s, "a song," especially one slow and monotonous, from chant (v.), or else from French chant (12c.), from Latin cantus "song, a singing; bird-song," from past participle stem of canere. Meaning "a Gregorian melody," usually of medieval origin, is from 1789. Meaning "monotonous recitation of words" is from 1815.

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Definitions of chant
1
chant (v.)
recite with musical intonation; recite as a chant or a psalm;
The rabbi chanted a prayer
Synonyms: intone / intonate / cantillate
chant (v.)
utter monotonously and repetitively and rhythmically;
The students chanted the same slogan over and over again
Synonyms: tone / intone
2
chant (n.)
a repetitive song in which as many syllables as necessary are assigned to a single tone;
From wordnet.princeton.edu