Etymology
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cement (n.)

kind of mortar or other substance that hardens as it dries, used to bind, c. 1300, from Old French ciment "cement, mortar, pitch," from Latin cæmenta "stone chips used for making mortar" (singular caementum), from caedere "to cut down, chop, beat, hew, fell, slay" (from PIE root *kae-id- "to strike"). The sense evolution from "small broken stones" to "powdered stones used in construction" took place before the word reached English. Cement-mixer is from 1875.

The term properly includes papier maché, gums, glues, mucilages, limes, mortars, and a great number of compounds of such nature as to admit of their assuming, under certain conditions, sticky, tenacious, or stone-like consistency. [Century Dictionary]

cement (v.)

c. 1400,  "to bind (solid bodies) together with or as with cement," from cement (n.) or Old French cimenter. Figurative sense "to unite firmly" is from c. 1600. Related: Cemented; cementing.

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Definitions of cement
1
cement (n.)
concrete pavement is sometimes referred to as cement;
they stood on the grey cement beside the pool
cement (n.)
a building material that is a powder made of a mixture of calcined limestone and clay; used with water and sand or gravel to make concrete and mortar;
cement (n.)
something that hardens to act as adhesive material;
cement (n.)
any of various materials used by dentists to fill cavities in teeth;
cement (n.)
a specialized bony substance covering the root of a tooth;
Synonyms: cementum
2
cement (v.)
make fast as if with cement;
We cemented our friendship
cement (v.)
cover or coat with cement;
cement (v.)
bind or join with or as if with cement;
From wordnet.princeton.edu