Etymology
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cat (n.)

Old English catt (c. 700) "domestic cat," from West Germanic (c. 400-450), from Proto-Germanic *kattuz (source also of Old Frisian katte, Old Norse köttr, Dutch kat, Old High German kazza, German Katze), from Late Latin cattus.

The near-universal European word now, it appeared in Europe as Latin catta (Martial, c. 75 C.E.), Byzantine Greek katta (c. 350) and was in general use on the continent by c. 700, replacing Latin feles. Probably ultimately Afro-Asiatic (compare Nubian kadis, Berber kadiska, both meaning "cat"). Arabic qitt "tomcat" may be from the same source. Cats were domestic in Egypt from c. 2000 B.C.E., but not a familiar household animal to classical Greeks and Romans. The nine lives have been proverbial at least since 1560s.

The Late Latin word also is the source of Old Irish and Gaelic cat, Welsh kath, Breton kaz, Italian gatto, Spanish gato, French chat (12c.). Independent, but ultimately from the same source are words in the Slavic group: Old Church Slavonic kotuka, kotel'a, Bulgarian kotka, Russian koška, Polish kot, along with Lithuanian katė and non-Indo-European Finnish katti, which is from Lithuanian.

Extended to lions, tigers, etc. c. 1600. As a term of contempt for a woman, from early 13c. Slang sense of "prostitute" is from at least c. 1400. Slang sense of "fellow, guy," is from 1920, originally in African-American vernacular; narrower sense of "jazz enthusiast" is recorded from 1931.

Cat's paw (1769, but cat's foot in the same sense, 1590s) refers to the old folk tale in which the monkey tricks the cat into pawing chestnuts from a fire; the monkey gets the roasted nuts, the cat gets a burnt paw. Cat burglar is from 1907, so called for stealth. Cat-witted "small-minded, obstinate, and spiteful" (1670s) deserved to survive. For Cat's meow, cat's pajamas, see bee's knees. For let the cat out of the bag, see bag (n.).

CAT

1975, medical acronym for computerized axial tomography or something like it. Related: CAT scan.

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Definitions of cat
1
cat (n.)
feline mammal usually having thick soft fur and no ability to roar: domestic cats; wildcats;
Synonyms: true cat
cat (n.)
an informal term for a youth or man;
Synonyms: guy / hombre / bozo / sod
cat (n.)
a spiteful woman gossip;
what a cat she is!
cat (n.)
the leaves of the shrub Catha edulis which are chewed like tobacco or used to make tea; has the effect of a euphoric stimulant;
Synonyms: kat / khat / qat / quat / Arabian tea / African tea
cat (n.)
a whip with nine knotted cords;
British sailors feared the cat
cat (n.)
a large tracked vehicle that is propelled by two endless metal belts; frequently used for moving earth in construction and farm work;
Synonyms: Caterpillar
cat (n.)
any of several large cats typically able to roar and living in the wild;
Synonyms: big cat
cat (n.)
a method of examining body organs by scanning them with X rays and using a computer to construct a series of cross-sectional scans along a single axis;
Synonyms: computerized tomography / computed tomography / ct / computerized axial tomography / computed axial tomography
2
cat (v.)
beat with a cat-o'-nine-tails;
cat (v.)
eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth;
Synonyms: vomit / vomit up / purge / cast / sick / be sick / disgorge / regorge / retch / puke / barf / spew / spue / chuck / upchuck / honk / regurgitate / throw up
From wordnet.princeton.edu