Advertisement

capture (n.)

"act of taking or seizing," 1540s, from French capture "a taking," from Latin captura "a taking" (especially of animals), from captus, past participle of capere "to take, hold, seize" (from PIE root *kap- "to grasp").

capture (v.)

"take or seize by force or stratagem," 1779, from capture (n.); in chess, checkers, etc., "win by ingenuity or skill," 1819. Related: Captured; capturing. Earlier verb in this sense was captive (early 15c.).

Others are reading

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of capture from WordNet
1
capture (v.)
succeed in representing or expressing something intangible;
capture the essence of Spring
capture an idea
capture (v.)
attract; cause to be enamored;
She captured all the men's hearts
Synonyms: enamour / trance / catch / becharm / enamor / captivate / beguile / charm / fascinate / bewitch / entrance / enchant
capture (v.)
succeed in catching or seizing, especially after a chase;
Synonyms: get / catch
capture (v.)
bring about the capture of an elementary particle or celestial body and causing it enter a new orbit;
This nucleus has captured the slow-moving neutrons
The star captured a comet
capture (v.)
take possession of by force, as after an invasion;
The militia captured the castle
Synonyms: appropriate / seize / conquer
capture (v.)
capture as if by hunting, snaring, or trapping;
Synonyms: catch
2
capture (n.)
the act of forcibly dispossessing an owner of property;
Synonyms: gaining control / seizure
capture (n.)
a process whereby a star or planet holds an object in its gravitational field;
capture (n.)
any process in which an atomic or nuclear system acquires an additional particle;
capture (n.)
the act of taking of a person by force;
Synonyms: seizure
capture (n.)
the removal of an opponent's piece from the chess board;
From wordnet.princeton.edu