Etymology
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captive (adj.)

late 14c., "made prisoner, enslaved," from Latin captivus "caught, taken prisoner," from captus, past participle of capere "to take, hold, seize" (from PIE root *kap- "to grasp"). Captive audience is from 1849.

captive (n.)

"one who is taken and kept in confinement; one who is completely in the power of another," c. 1400, from noun use of Latin captivus "caught, taken prisoner" (see captive (adj.)). An Old English noun was hæftling, from hæft "taken, seized" (see haft (n.)), which is from the same root.

updated on April 17, 2022

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Definitions of captive from WordNet
1
captive (n.)
a person who is confined; especially a prisoner of war;
Synonyms: prisoner
captive (n.)
an animal that is confined;
captive (n.)
a person held in the grip of a strong emotion or passion;
2
captive (adj.)
being in captivity;
Synonyms: confined / imprisoned / jailed
captive (adj.)
giving or marked by complete attention to; "so intent on this fantastic...narrative that she hardly stirred"- Walter de la Mare;
Synonyms: absorbed / engrossed / enwrapped / intent / wrapped
Etymologies are not definitions. From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.