Etymology
Advertisement

caption (n.)

late 14c., "a taking, seizure," from Old French capcion "arrest, capture, imprisonment," or directly from Latin captionem (nominative capito) "a catching, seizing, holding, taking," noun of action from past-participle stem of capere "to take" (from PIE root *kap- "to grasp").

It was used from mid-17c. in the wording at the head of legal documents involving seizure, deposition, etc. ("Certificate of caption"). Thus the sense was extended to "the beginning of any document," and further to "heading of a chapter or section of an article" (1789), and, especially in U.S., "description or title below an illustration" (1919).

caption (v.)

"write a caption for, affix a caption on or to," by 1901, from caption (n.). Related: Captioned; captioning.

updated on April 17, 2022

Advertisement
Advertisement
Definitions of caption from WordNet
1
caption (n.)
taking exception; especially a quibble based on a captious argument;
a mere caption unworthy of a reply
caption (n.)
translation of foreign dialogue of a movie or TV program; usually displayed at the bottom of the screen;
Synonyms: subtitle
caption (n.)
brief description accompanying an illustration;
Synonyms: legend
2
caption (v.)
provide with a caption, as of a photograph or a drawing;
From wordnet.princeton.edu, not affiliated with etymonline.