Etymology
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cabin (n.)

mid-14c., "small house or habitation," especially one rudely constructed, from Old French cabane "hut, cottage, small house," from Old Provençal cabana, from Late Latin capanna "hut" (source also of Spanish cabana, Italian capanna); a word of doubtful origin. Modern French cabine (18c.), Italian cabino are English loan-words.

Meaning "room or partition of a ship" (later especially one set aside for use of officers) is from mid-14c. Cabin fever first recorded by 1918 in the "need to get out and about" sense; earlier (1820s) it was a term for typhus.

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Definitions of cabin
1
cabin (n.)
small room on a ship or boat where people sleep;
cabin (n.)
a small house built of wood; usually in a wooded area;
cabin (n.)
the enclosed compartment of an aircraft or spacecraft where passengers are carried;
2
cabin (v.)
confine to a small space, such as a cabin;
From wordnet.princeton.edu