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bury (v.)

Old English byrgan "to raise a mound, hide, enclose in a grave or tomb, inter," akin to beorgan "to shelter," from Proto-Germanic *burzjan- "protection, shelter" (source also of Old Saxon bergan, Dutch bergen, Old Norse bjarga, Swedish berga, Old High German bergan "protect, shelter, conceal," German bergen, Gothic bairgan "to save, preserve"), from PIE root *bhergh- (1) "to hide, protect." Meaning "cover, conceal from sight" is from 1711. Related: Buried; burying. Burying-ground "cemetery" attested from 1711. Buried treasure is from 1801.

The Old English -y- was a short "oo" sound, like modern French -u-. Under normal circumstances it transformed into Modern English -i- (in bridge, kiss, listen, sister, etc.), but in bury and a few other words (merry, knell) it retained a Kentish change to "e" that took place in the late Old English period. In the West Midlands, meanwhile, the Old English -y- sound persisted, slightly modified over time, giving the standard modern pronunciation of blush, much, church.

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Definitions of bury

bury (v.)
cover from sight;
Afghani women buried under their burkas
bury (v.)
place in a grave or tomb;
Stalin was buried behind the Kremlin wall on Red Square
Synonyms: entomb / inhume / inter / lay to rest
bury (v.)
place in the earth and cover with soil;
They buried the stolen goods
bury (v.)
enclose or envelop completely, as if by swallowing;
Synonyms: immerse / swallow / swallow up / eat up
bury (v.)
embed deeply;
He buried his head in her lap
Synonyms: sink
bury (v.)
dismiss from the mind; stop remembering;
I tried to bury these unpleasant memories
Synonyms: forget
From wordnet.princeton.edu