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budget (n.)

early 15c., bouget, "leather pouch, small bag or sack," from Old French bougette, diminutive of bouge "leather bag, wallet, pouch," from Latin bulga "leather bag," a word of Gaulish origin (compare Old Irish bolg "bag," Breton bolc'h "flax pod"), from PIE *bhelgh- "to swell," extended form of root *bhel- (2) "to blow, swell."

The modern financial meaning "statement of probable expenditures and revenues" (1733) is from the notion of the treasury minister keeping his fiscal plans in a wallet. Also used from late 16c. in a general sense of "a stock, store, or collection of miscellaneous items," which led to 18c. transferred sense "bundle of news," hence the use of the word as the title of some newspapers.

budget (v.)

"to include in a (fiscal) budget," 1884, from budget (n.). Related: Budgeted; budgeting.

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Definitions of budget from WordNet
1
budget (n.)
a sum of money allocated for a particular purpose;
the laboratory runs on a budget of a million a year
budget (n.)
a summary of intended expenditures along with proposals for how to meet them;
the president submitted the annual budget to Congress
2
budget (v.)
make a budget;
From wordnet.princeton.edu