Etymology
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bubble (n.)

"small vesicle of water or some other fluid inflated with air or gas," early 14c., perhaps from Middle Dutch bobbel (n.) and/or Middle Low German bubbeln (v.), all probably of echoic origin. Figurative use in reference to anything wanting firmness, substance, or permanence is from 1590s. Specifically in reference to inflated markets or financial schemes originally in South Sea Bubble, which originated c. 1711 and collapsed 1720. Bubble-bath recorded by 1937. Bubble-shell is from 1847.

bubble (v.)

late 15c., bobelen, "to form or rise in bubbles," perhaps from bubble (n.) and/or from Middle Low German bubbeln (v.), which is probably of echoic origin. From 1610s as "cause to bubble." Related: Bubbled; bubbling.

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Definitions of bubble
1
bubble (v.)
form, produce, or emit bubbles;
bubble (v.)
flow in an irregular current with a bubbling noise;
Synonyms: ripple / babble / guggle / burble / gurgle
bubble (v.)
rise in bubbles or as if in bubbles;
bubble to the surface
bubble (v.)
cause to form bubbles;
bubble gas through a liquid
bubble (v.)
expel gas from the stomach;
Synonyms: burp / belch / eruct
2
bubble (n.)
a hollow globule of gas (e.g., air or carbon dioxide);
bubble (n.)
a speculative scheme that depends on unstable factors that the planner cannot control;
a real estate bubble
Synonyms: house of cards
bubble (n.)
an impracticable and illusory idea;
he didn't want to burst the newcomer's bubble
bubble (n.)
a dome-shaped covering made of transparent glass or plastic;
From wordnet.princeton.edu

Dictionary entries near bubble

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