Etymology
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breeze (n.)

1560s, "moderate north or northeast wind," from Old Spanish briza "cold northeast wind;" in West Indies and Spanish Main, the sense shifting to "northeast trade wind," then "brisk, fresh wind from the sea." English sense of "gentle or light wind" is from 1620s. An alternative possibility is that the English word is from East Frisian brisen "to blow fresh and strong." The slang sense of "something easy" is American English, c. 1928.

breeze (v.)

1680s, "blow gently," from breeze (n.). Meaning "move briskly" is from 1904. Related: Breezed; breezing.

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Definitions of breeze
1
breeze (v.)
blow gently and lightly;
It breezes most evenings at the shore
breeze (v.)
to proceed quickly and easily;
2
breeze (n.)
a slight wind (usually refreshing);
the breeze was cooled by the lake
Synonyms: zephyr / gentle wind / air
breeze (n.)
any undertaking that is easy to do;
Synonyms: cinch / picnic / snap / duck soup / child's play / pushover / walkover / piece of cake
From wordnet.princeton.edu