Etymology
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breathe (v.)

"to draw air into and expel it from the lungs; to inhale and exhale (a scent, etc.)," c. 1200, not in Old English, but it retains the original Old English vowel of its source word, breath. To breathe (one's) last "die" is from 1590s. To breathe down the back of (someone's) neck "be close behind" is by 1946. Related: Breathed; breathing.

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Definitions of breathe

breathe (v.)
draw air into, and expel out of, the lungs;
I can breathe better when the air is clean
Synonyms: take a breath / respire / suspire
breathe (v.)
be alive;
Every creature that breathes
breathe (v.)
impart as if by breathing;
He breathed new life into the old house
breathe (v.)
allow the passage of air through;
Our new synthetic fabric breathes and is perfect for summer wear
breathe (v.)
utter or tell;
not breathe a word
breathe (v.)
manifest or evince;
She breathes the Christian spirit
breathe (v.)
take a short break from one's activities in order to relax;
Synonyms: rest / catch one's breath / take a breather
breathe (v.)
reach full flavor by absorbing air and being let to stand after having been uncorked;
This rare Bordeaux must be allowed to breathe for at least 2 hours
breathe (v.)
expel (gases or odors);
Synonyms: emit / pass off
From wordnet.princeton.edu