Etymology
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bowl (n.1)

"round, low vessel to hold liquids or liquid food," Old English bolla "pot, cup, bowl," from Proto-Germanic *bul- "a round vessel" (source also of Old Norse bolle, Old High German bolla), from PIE root *bhel- (2) "to blow, swell." Formerly also "a large drinking cup," hence figurative use as an emblem of festivity or drunkenness. In reference to a football-stadium 1913, originally one that is bowl-shaped.

bowl (v.)

"to roll a ball on the ground," typically as part of a game or contest, mid-15c., from bowl "wooden ball" (see bowls). Specifically in cricket, "deliver the ball to be played by the batsman," from 1755; the cricket sense is source of late 19c. figurative expressions bowl over "knock down" (1849), etc. Related: Bowled; bowling.

bowl (n.2)

"sphere, globe, ball," c. 1400, from Old French boule "ball," from Latin bulla "round swelling, knob" (see bull (n.2)). Meaning "large, solid ball of hard wood used in the game of bowls" is from mid-15c.

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Definitions of bowl
1
bowl (n.)
a round vessel that is open at the top; used chiefly for holding food or liquids;
bowl (n.)
a concave shape with an open top;
Synonyms: trough
bowl (n.)
a dish that is round and open at the top for serving foods;
bowl (n.)
the quantity contained in a bowl;
Synonyms: bowlful
bowl (n.)
a large structure for open-air sports or entertainments;
Synonyms: stadium / arena / sports stadium
bowl (n.)
a large ball with finger holes used in the sport of bowling;
Synonyms: bowling ball
bowl (n.)
a wooden ball (with flattened sides so that it rolls on a curved course) used in the game of lawn bowling;
bowl (n.)
a small round container that is open at the top for holding tobacco;
Synonyms: pipe bowl
bowl (n.)
the act of rolling something (as the ball in bowling);
Synonyms: roll
2
bowl (v.)
roll (a ball);
bowl (v.)
hurl a cricket ball from one end of the pitch towards the batsman at the other end;
bowl (v.)
engage in the sport of bowling;
My parents like to bowl on Friday nights
From wordnet.princeton.edu