Etymology
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bounce (v.)

early 13c., bounsen "to thump, hit," of uncertain origin, perhaps from Dutch bonzen "to beat, thump," or Low German bunsen, or imitative. The sense probably has been influenced by bound (v.). In 17c., "to talk big, bluster; bully, scold." Meaning "to bound like a ball" is from 1510s; transitive sense "cause to rebound" is from 1876. Of a check, "be returned for insufficient funds" is from 1927. Related: Bounced; bouncing.

bounce (n.)

1520s, "a heavy blow," also "a leap, a rebound" from bounce (v.). In reference to politicians and public opinion polls, by 1996, American English.

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Definitions of bounce
1
bounce (v.)
spring back; spring away from an impact;
The rubber ball bounced
Synonyms: resile / take a hop / spring / bound / rebound / recoil / reverberate / ricochet
bounce (v.)
hit something so that it bounces;
bounce a ball
bounce (v.)
move up and down repeatedly;
Synonyms: jounce
bounce (v.)
come back after being refused;
the check bounced
bounce (v.)
leap suddenly;
He bounced to his feet
bounce (v.)
refuse to accept and send back;
bounce a check
bounce (v.)
eject from the premises;
The ex-boxer's job is to bounce people who want to enter this private club
2
bounce (n.)
a light, self-propelled movement upwards or forwards;
Synonyms: leap / leaping / spring / saltation / bound
bounce (n.)
the quality of a substance that is able to rebound;
Synonyms: bounciness
bounce (n.)
rebounding from an impact (or series of impacts);
Synonyms: bouncing
From wordnet.princeton.edu