Etymology
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bottle (n.)

"narrow-necked hollow vessel for holding and carrying liquids," mid-14c., originally of leather, from Old French boteille (12c., Modern French bouteille), from Vulgar Latin *butticula (source also of Spanish botella, Italian bottiglia), diminutive of Late Latin buttis "a cask," which is perhaps from Greek.

In reference to a baby's feeding bottle by 1848 (sucking-bottle is attested from 1844). The bottle, figurative for "liquor," is from 17c. Bottle-washer is from 1837; bottle-shop is from 1929; bottle-opener as a mechanical device is from 1875. Bottle-arsed was old printers' slang for type wider at one end than the other.

bottle (v.)

1640s, "put into a bottle for storing and keeping," from bottle (n.). Earlier in a figurative sense, of feelings, etc., 1620s. Related: Bottled; bottling.

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Definitions of bottle
1
bottle (n.)
a glass or plastic vessel used for storing drinks or other liquids; typically cylindrical without handles and with a narrow neck that can be plugged or capped;
bottle (n.)
the quantity contained in a bottle;
Synonyms: bottleful
bottle (n.)
a vessel fitted with a flexible teat and filled with milk or formula; used as a substitute for breast feeding infants and very young children;
Synonyms: feeding bottle / nursing bottle
2
bottle (v.)
store (liquids or gases) in bottles;
bottle (v.)
put into bottles;
bottle the mineral water
From wordnet.princeton.edu