Etymology
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botch (v.)

late 14c., bocchen "to repair," later, "repair clumsily, to spoil by unskillful work" (1520s); of unknown origin. Middle English Compendium says probably the same as bocchen "to swell up or fester; to bulge or project" (though this is only from early 15c. and OED denies a connection) which is from Old North French boche, Old French boce, a common Romanic word of uncertain origin. Related: Botched; botching.

As a noun, "a bungled or ill-finished part," from c. 1600, perhaps from the verb, but compare Middle English bocche "a boil, a pathological swelling, a tumor" (late 14c.), used especially of glandular swellings from the plague, also figuratively "a corrupt person; a rotten condition" (late 14c.), "a hump on a cripple" (early 14c.), which probably is from Old North French boche, Old French boce, a common Romanic word of uncertain origin.

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Definitions of botch
1
botch (v.)
make a mess of, destroy or ruin;
I botched the dinner and we had to eat out
Synonyms: bodge / bumble / fumble / botch up / muff / blow / flub / screw up / ball up / spoil / muck up / bungle / fluff / bollix / bollix up / bollocks / bollocks up / bobble / mishandle / louse up / foul up / mess up / fuck up
2
botch (n.)
an embarrassing mistake;
Synonyms: blunder / blooper / bloomer / bungle / pratfall / foul-up / fuckup / flub / boner / boo-boo
From wordnet.princeton.edu