Etymology
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bond (n.)

early 13c., "anything that binds, fastens, or confines," phonetic variant of band (n.1) and at first interchangeable with it. For vowel change, see long (adj.); also influenced by unrelated Old English bonda "householder," literally "dweller" (see bond (adj.)).

It preserves more distinctly than band the connection with bind and bound (adj.1) and is now the main or only form in the sense of "restraining or uniting force." From early 14c. as "an agreement or covenant;" from late 14c. as "a binding or uniting power or influence." Legalistic sense "an instrument binding one to pay a sum to another" first recorded 1590s. Meaning "a method of laying bricks in courses" is from 1670s. In chemistry, of atoms, by 1900.

bond (v.)

1670s, "to put in a bond" (transitive), from bond (n.). Intransitive sense "hold together from being bonded" is from 1836. Originally of things; of persons by 1969.

bond (adj.)

c. 1300, "in a state of a serf, unfree," from bond (n.) "tenant, farmer holding land under a lord in return for customary service; a married bond as head of a household" (mid-13c.). The Old English form was bonda, bunda "husbandman, householder," but the Middle English word probably is from Old Norse *bonda, a contraction of boande, buande "occupier and tiller of soil, peasant, husbandman," a noun from the past participle of bua, boa "to dwell" (from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow").

"In the more despotic Norway and Denmark, bo'ndi became a word of contempt, denoting the common low people. ... In the Icelandic Commonwealth the word has a good sense, and is often used of the foremost men ...." [OED]. The sense of the noun deteriorated in English after the Conquest and the rise of the feudal system, from "free farmer" to "serf, slave" (c. 1300) and the word became associated with unrelated bond (n.) and bound (adj.1).

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Definitions of bond
1
bond (n.)
an electrical force linking atoms;
Synonyms: chemical bond
bond (n.)
a certificate of debt (usually interest-bearing or discounted) that is issued by a government or corporation in order to raise money; the issuer is required to pay a fixed sum annually until maturity and then a fixed sum to repay the principal;
Synonyms: bond certificate
bond (n.)
a connection based on kinship or marriage or common interest;
their friendship constitutes a powerful bond between them
Synonyms: alliance
bond (n.)
(criminal law) money that must be forfeited by the bondsman if an accused person fails to appear in court for trial;
a $10,000 bond was furnished by an alderman
Synonyms: bail / bail bond
bond (n.)
a restraint that confines or restricts freedom (especially something used to tie down or restrain a prisoner);
Synonyms: shackle / hamper / trammel
bond (n.)
a connection that fastens things together;
Synonyms: attachment
bond (n.)
a superior quality of strong durable white writing paper; originally made for printing documents;
Synonyms: bond paper
bond (n.)
the property of sticking together (as of glue and wood) or the joining of surfaces of different composition;
Synonyms: adhesiveness / adhesion / adherence
2
bond (v.)
stick to firmly;
Synonyms: adhere / hold fast / bind / stick / stick to
bond (v.)
create social or emotional ties;
The grandparents want to bond with the child
Synonyms: bind / tie / attach
bond (v.)
issue bonds on;
bond (v.)
bring together in a common cause or emotion;
Synonyms: draw together
3
Bond (n.)
United States civil rights leader who was elected to the legislature in Georgia but was barred from taking his seat because he opposed the Vietnam War (born 1940);
Synonyms: Julian Bond
Bond (n.)
British secret operative 007 in novels by Ian Fleming;
Synonyms: James Bond
From wordnet.princeton.edu