Etymology
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boggle (v.)

1590s, "to start with fright (as a startled horse does), shy, take alarm," from Middle English bugge "specter" (among other things, supposed to scare horses at night); see bug (n.); also compare bogey (n.1), boggart. The meaning " hesitate, stop as if afraid to proceed in fear of unforeseen difficulties" is from 1630s; that of "confound, cause to hesitate" is from 1640s. As a noun from 1650s. Related: Boggled; boggling; boggler (from c. 1600 as "one who hesitates").

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Definitions of boggle

boggle (v.)
startle with amazement or fear;
boggle (v.)
hesitate when confronted with a problem, or when in doubt or fear;
boggle (v.)
overcome with amazement;
This boggles the mind!
Synonyms: flabbergast / bowl over
From wordnet.princeton.edu